Write a comment

Sound: *********
Value: *******1/2
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

Reviewers' ChoiceElectrostatic headphones seem to live in the shadow of planar magnetics, even though the two are similar in many ways. Why aren’t electrostatics getting more love? Because they’re kind of a pain. They need an amplifier that can provide hundreds of volts of charge to the electrostatic membrane that is part of each driver, so you can’t plug them straight into a smartphone or laptop. The HiFiMan Jade IIs might help the electrostatic category get a little more love -- not because they’re any less of a hassle than other electrostatic headphones, but because they’re only $2500 USD for the headphones and the amp. That’s far from cheap, but considering that the best-known headphones in the category, the Stax SR-009s, cost about $5000 with an amp, and many new planars cost $3000 or more, the Jade IIs seem like something of a bargain.

1 Comment

Sound: ******
Value: *******
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

In many ways, the MEE Audio Matrix Cinema ANCs are the headphones of the future. As the name suggests, they’re built not just for music listening, but for all sorts of media, including movies and YouTube. As required of pretty much any under-$300 headphones that hope to succeed in today’s marketplace, they have Bluetooth -- and not just Bluetooth, but aptX Low Latency, which eliminates the lip-sync problems that standard Bluetooth suffers from. They’re also primed for mobile use, with active noise canceling and a fold-flat design convenient for traveling. The battery is rated at 20 hours for music playback with Bluetooth and noise canceling on, and 33 hours with Bluetooth only. Not bad for $149.99 USD.

2 Comments

Sound: ********1/2
Value: ********
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

I’d probably never have paid Status Audio -- or its new BT One headphones -- any attention were it not for something I never asked them to send. I’d requested a set of the company’s OB-1 open-back headphones for a comparison test, and they threw in a set of the closed-back CB-1s for good measure. Months later, desperate for headphones that would be better for mixing my recordings than Sony’s mildly bass-boosted MDR-7506es, I gave the CB-1s a try -- and their neutral, balanced sound (which resulted in neutral, balanced mixes) immediately made them my pro monitoring and mixing headphones of choice. Pretty impressive for $59 USD.

1 Comment

Sound: **********
Value: ********
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

Reviewers' ChoiceThe Empyreans represent the gutsiest move the headphone biz has seen in a long time. At $2999 USD, they’re almost ten times the price of Meze Audio’s next-priciest over-ear headphones, the 99 Classics ($309). They use a new driver technology I’ve never seen before. And they’re designed and manufactured in the medieval country town of Baia Mare, Romania, which isn’t exactly a tech nexus.

3 Comments

Sound: *******1/2
Value: *******
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

If you asked me to name a high-end headphone brand, I might think first of Audeze or HiFiMan. But ten years ago, I might have named Denon first. Much -- actually, almost everything -- in the headphone world has changed since then. Yet Denon has taken a relatively low-key approach to the hype-heavy headphone market. Even the company’s most elite current models were “soft launched,” posted on the company’s site with little fanfare. The AH-D7200 headphones ($999 USD) were introduced in December 2016, but I only found out about them when I stumbled upon them at CES in January.

Write a comment

Sound: *****
Value: *****
(Read about our ratings)

Measurements can be found by clicking this link.

After seeing prototypes of the Cleer Next headphones at a couple of trade shows, I’d filed them into my “if it ever ships” mental folder and soon forgotten about them -- and thus missed the initial introduction of these last fall. Fortunately, Cleer had to send me a sample of its other headphones, the Flow noise-canceling model, for a measurement project and offered to throw in the Nexts, too. Considering that the company seems in the midst of a major ramp-up, I thought I’d give the Nexts a proper technical workup to see where this company’s starting from -- and I’m glad I did, because they’re among the more interesting audiophile headphones I’ve recently encountered.

SoundStage! Expert: Sonus faber Olympica Nova Speakers - 1) General Care (February 2020)

SoundStage! Expert: Sonus faber Olympica Nova Speakers - 2) Grille Care (February 2020)

SoundStage! Expert: Sonus faber Olympica Nova Speakers - 3) Cleaning (February 2020)

Latest Comments

Brent Butterworth 9 hours ago The Biggest Lie in Audio
@Klaus ChristensenWe have fully arrived when it comes to predicting what speakers and headphones most people ...
Doug Schneider 10 hours ago The Biggest Lie in Audio
@Klaus Christensen"My point is (and it is the only point!) that we haven’t fully arrived."

I agree ...
Klaus Christensen 19 hours ago The Biggest Lie in Audio
@Doug SchneiderBasically we are in agreement!
The subjectivism versus the objectivism debate has been going on for ...
Doug Schneider 1 days ago The Biggest Lie in Audio
@Klaus Christensen"So for me Herb Reichert is right to some extent."

The real problem is that Herb ...
Brent Butterworth 1 days ago Denon AH-D7200 Headphones
@Klaus ChristensenYou are very fortunate to have a shop where you can go hear all these, ...